top of page

Supporting Brands' Accessibility

What accessibility means when it comes to digital?

In its broadest sense, accessibility refers to the inclusion of all people, including those with disabilities or impairments. When it comes to digital accessibility, this means making sure that everyone can access and use digital content and services, regardless of any disability they may have.

There are many different types of disabilities and impairments that can make it difficult or impossible for someone to use digital content or services. These include visual impairments, hearing impairments, physical impairments, cognitive impairments, and more.

Making digital content and services accessible means taking into account the needs of all potential users, and designing them in a way that everyone can use them equally effectively. This includes ensuring that the content is compatible with assistive technologies (such as screen readers or screen magnifiers), and that it can be navigated using a keyboard or other input device.

We work closely with our clients to create high-quality websites and digital products that are accessible to everyone. Our team is experienced in designing and developing accessible websites and we are committed to supporting the accessibility of all brands.

Why is information architecture important for brands?

Accessibility is important for two main reasons:

First, it is a fundamental human right. Everyone deserves to be able to access and use digital content and services, regardless of any disability they may have.

Second, accessible digital content and services are better for everyone. When digital content and services are designed to be accessible, they are easier and more enjoyable to use for everyone – not just those with disabilities or impairments. Good design benefits all users, including people who do not have any disabilities or impairments.

Examples of accessibility built into a website

What does accessibility look like built into a website?

There are many different aspects of accessibility that can be built into a website. Here are some examples:

Text size and colour: The text on a website should be easy to read, even for people with vision impairments. The text should be a reasonable size, and the contrast between the text and the background should be high enough to make the text easy to read.

Alt text: All images on a website should have alt text (alternative text), which is a brief description of the image. This is important for people who are unable to see the image, and for people who are using screen readers.

Navigation: The navigation on a website should be easy to use, even for people with physical impairments. The navigation should be clear and logical, and it should be easy to move around the website using a touchpad or other input device.

Forms: All forms on a website should be accessible, even for people with cognitive impairments. The forms should be easy to understand and fill out, and they should be compatible with assistive technologies such

Compatibility with screen readers and other tools

Compatibility with screen readers is one of the most important aspects of accessibility.

Screen readers are software programs that convert text into speech, which makes it possible for people who are blind or have low vision to use a computer.

All websites should be compatible with screen readers, and all digital content should be able to be read by a screen reader. In addition, all digital content should be able to be navigated using a keyboard or other input device.

View case Study

Web accessibility guidelines and standards

There are several international guidelines and standards for web accessibility. The most important of these is the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), which is a set of guidelines for making web content accessible.

WCAG is developed by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), and it is currently in its second version, WCAG 2.0. WCAG 2.0 has three levels of conformance: A, AA, and AAA. Level A is the minimum level of accessibility, and Level AAA is the highest level.

Most countries have their own web accessibility guidelines and standards, which are based on WCAG.

How Dave Clark partner with clients to bring accessible user experiences

At Dave Clark, we are committed to helping our clients create accessible digital content and services. We work with our clients to ensure that their websites and digital content are compliant with accessibility guidelines and standards.

We also provide training to our clients on how to create and maintain accessible websites and digital content.

Some of the ways we help our clients create accessible user experiences include:

- Reviewing their website and digital content for accessibility compliance

- Providing training on web accessibility

- Creating alt text for images

- Designing navigational elements that are easy to use

- Building forms that are easy to understand and fill out

- Making sure that all digital content is compatible with screen readers and other assistive technologies

- Ensuring that their website is compatible with international accessibility guidelines and standards.

Check out our portfolio to see some examples of the accessible user experiences we have designed and developed for our clients.

If you would like to learn more about how we can help you create accessible digital content and services, contact us today.

Getting started with accessibility in your organisation

When making a website, it is important to consider the needs of everyone who may want to use it, including those with disabilities or impairments that can make it difficult for them to access or use digital content or services. This includes ensuring that the website is compatible with assistive technologies, and that it can be navigated using a mouse or other input device.

There are many different aspects of accessibility, and you don't have to implement them all at once. The most important thing is to get started, and to keep making progress over time.

Here are some tips for getting started with accessibility in your organisation:

1. Educate yourself and your team about accessibility. There are many resources available online, such as the Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) website from the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

2. Make sure everyone on your team is aware of the importance of accessibility, and of the needs of people with disabilities or impairments.

3. When creating or updating digital content or services, consider the needs of everyone who may want to use them. This includes people with disabilities or impairments that can make it difficult for them to access or use digital content or services.

4. Use appropriate tools and technologies to help you create accessible content and services. For example, there are many software programs that can help you create alt text for images, and there are also many tips and techniques that can help you make your content more accessible.

5. Test your content and services with people who have different disabilities or impairments, to make sure they are accessible and easy to use.

6. Keep making progress over time, and keep accessibility in mind when creating or updating digital content or services.

bottom of page